A new poll has discovered that British holidaymakers are planning to tip less for services abroad as they try to conserve their own finances.

A new poll has discovered that British holidaymakers are planning to tip less for services abroad as they try to conserve their own finances.

The survey, carried out by the Post Office, found that 36 per cent of people will not tip unless they receive excellent service, while 13 per cent said they would tip less frequently, no matter how good the service they receive.

Only eight per cent said they will tip hotel desk staff, while only seven per cent said they would tip travel reps and tour guides.

Helen Warburton, head of travel services at the Post Office, said that people should be aware that tipping may be more important in some countries than in others.

“When researching your holiday destination, do read up on the tipping etiquette for that country so that you can factor this into your spending budget,” she remarked.

“Familiarising yourself with the tipping culture will lessen your chance of causing offence and stop you spending money unnecessarily.”

People going on holidays to Thailand may be interested to know that tipping is not practiced except perhaps leaving the loose change from a restaurant bill or rounding the taxi fair up to an even number.

However, tipping is more common in hotels, particularly higher class venues.


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