A travel expert has said that people keen on holidays to India should not be put off by the monsoon which the country is currently experiencing.

A travel expert has said that people keen on holidays to India should not be put off by the monsoon which the country is currently experiencing.

Writing for the Irish Independent, Tom Hall from Lonely Planet said that while rain should be expected every day from July until October, all-day downpours are uncommon, plus it often means quieter resorts because there are fewer tourists.

“The monsoon is a crucial part of Indian life and if you do go – and you shouldn’t be put off unless you’re a complete beach bum – you’ll see a different side of the country to most people,” he remarked.

The Indian monsoon season begins in the south of the country at the start of June and usually covers the rest of India by July.

In hydrology, monsoon rainfall is considered to be that which occurs in any region that receives the majority of its rain during a particular season.

Other countries which experience such seasons include North America, South America, sub-Saharan Africa, Australia and East Asia.

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