Two ships have had near misses with outer reef in past month

There have been fresh calls in Australia for better protection of the Great Barrier Reef after a 45,000-tonne vessel almost ran aground over the weekend.

A 186-metre ship broke down and was adrift in the Coral Sea for some 48 hours before tugs were able to reach it – during which time it came perilously close to grounding on the outlying Shark Reef, AFP reported.

Australian Reef Pilots chief executive Simon Meyjes told the news agency that it was the second such incident in the past month.

In response, he believes the rules should be amended so that vessels are forced to travel in the shipping lanes inside the reef.

“Inside the Great Barrier Reef, they are in shallower and protected waters. They can anchor. And obviously they are much closer to help and the response time is much less,” he explained.

The world’s largest coral reef and one of the seven natural wonders, the Great Barrier Reef comprises over 3,000 individual reef systems and coral cays.

Written by Nicholas Scott

Find flights to Australia with Southall Travel

This site uses cookies to analyze traffic and for ads measurement purposes.
learn more about how we use cookies.

Many of the flights and flight-inclusive holidays on this website are financially protected by the ATOL scheme. But ATOL protection does not apply to all holiday and travel services listed on this website. Please ask us to confirm what protection may apply to your booking. If you do not receive an ATOL Certificate then the booking will not be ATOL protected. If you do receive an ATOL Certificate but all the parts of your trip are not listed on it, those parts will not be ATOL protected. If you have booked a flight only where the ticket is not issued immediately, your flight will be protected under our ATOL. Please see our booking conditions for information, or for more information about financial protection and the ATOL Certificate go to www.atol.org.uk/ATOLCertificate