In what may be pertinent advice for people going on holidays to India, Britons have been warned not to take risks when it comes to malaria.

In what may be pertinent advice for people going on holidays to India, Britons have been warned not to take risks when it comes to malaria.

Jo Yirrell, ambassador for Malaria Awareness, said that many people may underestimate the dangers of the disease.

“The trouble with malaria is that people put it down as a third world problem,” she attested.

The spokesperson urged people to have the relevant injections before they go on holiday and to make sure that they take their tablets while abroad.

However, Ms Yirrell said that despite this, people should not let malaria put them off going on holiday altogether.

“Just take the precautions and you will be fine,” she stressed.

Statistics from Malaria Awareness show that British people are now taking 190 per cent more trips to malarious countries than they were ten years ago.

Every year approximately 2,000 British travellers return home with the disease, which is carried by female mosquitoes.

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