British workers may find more opportunities to take holidays to India and other long haul destinations as their employers look for alternative ways to reward them during the recession.

British workers may find more opportunities to take holidays to India and other long haul destinations as their employers look for alternative ways to reward them during the recession.

This is according to research carried out by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI), which found that the average holiday entitlement for British managers has gone up from 25 days to 28 since last year, while two-thirds of firms now offer holidays instead of overtime.

Chief economist of the CMI Lord Eatwell said that the findings are encouraging and that firms who give staff benefits even during the credit crunch are likely to do better in terms of retention.

“It shows that business is growing up because today, unlike in 1991, there seems to be more determination to retain skilled staff,” he added.

Last month, Avinash Lalwani of American Express said he thinks ‘Generation Y’ will travel more than its predecessors thanks to a better connection with the wider world.

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